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January 2, 2013
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lllllllll[lll]l[lllllili[lll Smalltown Papers 217 W Cota St Shelton, WA 98584 i? 5O 2012: The year in review 2012 didn't herald the end of the world as many feared, but it was far from uneventful here in Morrow County. Above: A view from the Morrow County Courthouse in Heppner during the hailstorm that swept through South Morrow County on July 17, 2012. Vehicles around the area received broken windows and dents during the storm; roof damage was also reported in some places, as well as some minor crop issues. All in all, though, the county emerged largely unscathed from a storm that hammered the area with hailstones that some witnesses said were as large as ping-pong balls. See page FOUR for nore photos from 2012. Planning warm-water VOL. 132 NO. 1 6Pages Wednesday, January2,2013 Morrow County, Heppner, Oregon therapy at water pa rk Advocate for disabled This articlewasprovid- caltherapy alsouses hydro- "As someone with MS, I ed by the Comm unity Health Improvement Partnership of Morrow County. If you want to increase your winter activity level but find yourself with lim- ited options due to age, injury or disease, you may be interested in the Com- munity Health Improve- ment Partnership (CHIP) of Morrow County's latest endeavor. "To encourage individ- uals to increase daily physi- cal activity, our communi- ties need safe routes to walk and bike, as well as parks, playgrounds and commu- nity centers where people can find activities that are exciting and challenging enough to keep them en- gaged," says a spokesper- son for the group. To this end, a new workgroup is currently be- ing formed in Heppner in partnership with the Willow Creek Park District to rees- tablish operation of Willow Creek Water Park warm water therapy pool. The project is part of CHIP's efforts to promote healthy lifestyles and dis- ease/illness prevention, physical activity and the development of fitness in- frastructure. CHIP work- groups continue to meet throughout the county to identify obstacles and im- plement solutions, such as providing warm-water therapy. Aquatic physical ther- apy uses buoyancy and resistance of water to cre- ate a unique exercise en- vironment. Warm water pools make exercise easier and less painful for people recovering from injuries or suffering from chronic conditions. Aquatic physi- static pressure to decrease experience stiffness in my legs, swelling and improve joint and the therapy pool gives me position. The warmth of the ability to move more freely the water relaxes muscles and improves blood flow to injured areas. People with muscle spasms, back pain, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and fibromyalgia typically find aquatic therapy espe- cially beneficial. Repair of the hydro- therapy pool is already underway but the work- ing group is tasked with identifying means to cover thd' opeiatiotaal xpenses for heat, maintenance and personnel. and actually strengthen my muscles," says workgroup representative Merilee Mc- Dowell. "I want this for many others, which is the reason I'm asking for your help." Anyone who would be interested in using, or who suigports an individual who would be interested in using, the pool year-round is asked to volunteer and help make this worthwhile project happen. Contact McDowell at 54 i-571-5853 for details. Fair and rodeo queen celebr: ttes Christmas Krysten Powell (left), 2013 Morrow County Fair and Oregon Trail Pro Rodeo Queen, visits witll Santa Claus and Ivy Sand- ford during the festivities at the Celebrate Heppner Christmas dinner on Dec. 20. -Contributed photo seeks to help Heppner By Andrea Di Salvo An area disability ad- Vocate is trying to break ground in offering services and options to persons with disabilities in South Mor- row County. Darrin Umbarger, CEO and founder of Clearview Mediation and Disability Resource in Pendleton, is working to gain support to expand his workto an office in Heppner, which would also serve Lexington, Ione and outlying areas. "I want to be able to spend time over there help- ing whoever needs it. Right now it's a community not being served," he said. Umbarger, 47, has first- hand knowledge of the struggles faced by those living with disabilities. He has lived with Multiple Sclerosis more than half his life, since the age of 23. A Pendleton native, Umbarger met his future wife, Carol, in the ninth grade. The childhood sweet- hearts were married in 1986 and their son, Jeremy, was born in 1987. After working in the lumber mill in Pilot Rock, Umbarger started his own carpet and upholstery cleaning business. Things looked good for the new family. Then, one night in 1988, everything changed. "I went to bed one night in perfect health and woke up the next morning and coulln't walk, talk, do any- thing. It happened over- Darrin Umbarger (left), founder and CEO ofClearview MDRC in Pendleton, with son Jeremy at a Heppner Chamber of Com- merce meeting. The pair was at the meeting to speak about treatment of disabled persons. -Photo by David Sykes night. Surprise!" Umbarger, who now spends about 99 percent of his time in a wheelchair, said that, at first, his dis- ability embarrassed him. He ran the Pendleton Smoke Shop and then LIB Fishin', a business that manufac- tured and sold fishing tackle throughout North America. The whole time, he said he kept to himself, engaging the public as little as pos- sible. After a while, though, he saw a need he thought he could help meet. That was when he started Clearview MDRC. "There are so many needs...the communities are rural, it's not like the ADA (Americans with Dis- abilities Act) is big in this area. There are so many One gigantic places that are hard to get into. There are so many things they could do cheap- ly to make places more accessible. We're trying to break down barriers; it just helps everybody," Umbarger said. He started Clearview, a 501(c)(3) non-profit, to address the needs he saw in his own life and for oth- ers living with disabilities. Clearview offers a vari- ety of services, including job development, working to make buildings more accessible, peer-to-peer counseling, etiquette and sensitivity training, and a medical loan closet, from which they loan supplies such as wheelchairs and canes at no cost to those who need them. "With the medical loan closet we have a lot of different types of medical equipment that we loan out, stocking because some people only Chamb ual need it for a short time," he er ann said, giving the example luncheon this week Manager of the Heppner mini-mart Dawn Brosnan presents Derek Howard, 12, with the big Christmas stocking he won from Devin Oil. Derek is the son of DeRina and Matt Howard of Heppner. -Photo by April Sykes that sometimes electric wheelchairs break down or run out of power during a prolonged electrical outage, making a push wheelchair necessary for a short time. He said he would now like to expand the work he does in Pendleton to include Heppner and the rest of South Morrow. "People over there need recognition," said Um- barger. Umbarger said the ma- jority of the work they do in Pendleton deals with help- ing people with disabilities find employment, mostly -See DISABILITY AD VO- CATE/PA GE SIX This week's meeting at noon in the St. Patrick's Cost of lunch is $10; of the Heppner Chamber Senior Center dining room. Stable of Youth will cater. of Commerce will be the Chamber members will Lunch attendees are asked chamber's annual luncheon, vote on proposed by-law to RSVP no later than noon held on Thursday, Jan. 3, revisions at the meeting, the Wednesday before. 9top by for all your farm auto cold weather needs Wiper Blades - Diesel Additives / / / Morrow County Grain Growers Lexinlton 989-8221 1-800-452-7396 For tam equipment, visit our web site at www.mcgg.net ## lllllllll[lll]l[lllllili[lll Smalltown Papers 217 W Cota St Shelton, WA 98584 i? 5O 2012: The year in review 2012 didn't herald the end of the world as many feared, but it was far from uneventful here in Morrow County. Above: A view from the Morrow County Courthouse in Heppner during the hailstorm that swept through South Morrow County on July 17, 2012. Vehicles around the area received broken windows and dents during the storm; roof damage was also reported in some places, as well as some minor crop issues. All in all, though, the county emerged largely unscathed from a storm that hammered the area with hailstones that some witnesses said were as large as ping-pong balls. See page FOUR for nore photos from 2012. Planning warm-water VOL. 132 NO. 1 6Pages Wednesday, January2,2013 Morrow County, Heppner, Oregon therapy at water pa rk Advocate for disabled This articlewasprovid- caltherapy alsouses hydro- "As someone with MS, I ed by the Comm unity Health Improvement Partnership of Morrow County. If you want to increase your winter activity level but find yourself with lim- ited options due to age, injury or disease, you may be interested in the Com- munity Health Improve- ment Partnership (CHIP) of Morrow County's latest endeavor. "To encourage individ- uals to increase daily physi- cal activity, our communi- ties need safe routes to walk and bike, as well as parks, playgrounds and commu- nity centers where people can find activities that are exciting and challenging enough to keep them en- gaged," says a spokesper- son for the group. To this end, a new workgroup is currently be- ing formed in Heppner in partnership with the Willow Creek Park District to rees- tablish operation of Willow Creek Water Park warm water therapy pool. The project is part of CHIP's efforts to promote healthy lifestyles and dis- ease/illness prevention, physical activity and the development of fitness in- frastructure. CHIP work- groups continue to meet throughout the county to identify obstacles and im- plement solutions, such as providing warm-water therapy. Aquatic physical ther- apy uses buoyancy and resistance of water to cre- ate a unique exercise en- vironment. Warm water pools make exercise easier and less painful for people recovering from injuries or suffering from chronic conditions. Aquatic physi- static pressure to decrease experience stiffness in my legs, swelling and improve joint and the therapy pool gives me position. The warmth of the ability to move more freely the water relaxes muscles and improves blood flow to injured areas. People with muscle spasms, back pain, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and fibromyalgia typically find aquatic therapy espe- cially beneficial. Repair of the hydro- therapy pool is already underway but the work- ing group is tasked with identifying means to cover thd' opeiatiotaal xpenses for heat, maintenance and personnel. and actually strengthen my muscles," says workgroup representative Merilee Mc- Dowell. "I want this for many others, which is the reason I'm asking for your help." Anyone who would be interested in using, or who suigports an individual who would be interested in using, the pool year-round is asked to volunteer and help make this worthwhile project happen. Contact McDowell at 54 i-571-5853 for details. Fair and rodeo queen celebr: ttes Christmas Krysten Powell (left), 2013 Morrow County Fair and Oregon Trail Pro Rodeo Queen, visits witll Santa Claus and Ivy Sand- ford during the festivities at the Celebrate Heppner Christmas dinner on Dec. 20. -Contributed photo seeks to help Heppner By Andrea Di Salvo An area disability ad- Vocate is trying to break ground in offering services and options to persons with disabilities in South Mor- row County. Darrin Umbarger, CEO and founder of Clearview Mediation and Disability Resource in Pendleton, is working to gain support to expand his workto an office in Heppner, which would also serve Lexington, Ione and outlying areas. "I want to be able to spend time over there help- ing whoever needs it. Right now it's a community not being served," he said. Umbarger, 47, has first- hand knowledge of the struggles faced by those living with disabilities. He has lived with Multiple Sclerosis more than half his life, since the age of 23. A Pendleton native, Umbarger met his future wife, Carol, in the ninth grade. The childhood sweet- hearts were married in 1986 and their son, Jeremy, was born in 1987. After working in the lumber mill in Pilot Rock, Umbarger started his own carpet and upholstery cleaning business. Things looked good for the new family. Then, one night in 1988, everything changed. "I went to bed one night in perfect health and woke up the next morning and coulln't walk, talk, do any- thing. It happened over- Darrin Umbarger (left), founder and CEO ofClearview MDRC in Pendleton, with son Jeremy at a Heppner Chamber of Com- merce meeting. The pair was at the meeting to speak about treatment of disabled persons. -Photo by David Sykes night. Surprise!" Umbarger, who now spends about 99 percent of his time in a wheelchair, said that, at first, his dis- ability embarrassed him. He ran the Pendleton Smoke Shop and then LIB Fishin', a business that manufac- tured and sold fishing tackle throughout North America. The whole time, he said he kept to himself, engaging the public as little as pos- sible. After a while, though, he saw a need he thought he could help meet. That was when he started Clearview MDRC. "There are so many needs...the communities are rural, it's not like the ADA (Americans with Dis- abilities Act) is big in this area. There are so many One gigantic places that are hard to get into. There are so many things they could do cheap- ly to make places more accessible. We're trying to break down barriers; it just helps everybody," Umbarger said. He started Clearview, a 501(c)(3) non-profit, to address the needs he saw in his own life and for oth- ers living with disabilities. Clearview offers a vari- ety of services, including job development, working to make buildings more accessible, peer-to-peer counseling, etiquette and sensitivity training, and a medical loan closet, from which they loan supplies such as wheelchairs and canes at no cost to those who need them. "With the medical loan closet we have a lot of different types of medical equipment that we loan out, stocking because some people only Chamb ual need it for a short time," he er ann said, giving the example luncheon this week Manager of the Heppner mini-mart Dawn Brosnan presents Derek Howard, 12, with the big Christmas stocking he won from Devin Oil. Derek is the son of DeRina and Matt Howard of Heppner. -Photo by April Sykes that sometimes electric wheelchairs break down or run out of power during a prolonged electrical outage, making a push wheelchair necessary for a short time. He said he would now like to expand the work he does in Pendleton to include Heppner and the rest of South Morrow. "People over there need recognition," said Um- barger. Umbarger said the ma- jority of the work they do in Pendleton deals with help- ing people with disabilities find employment, mostly -See DISABILITY AD VO- CATE/PA GE SIX This week's meeting at noon in the St. Patrick's Cost of lunch is $10; of the Heppner Chamber Senior Center dining room. Stable of Youth will cater. of Commerce will be the Chamber members will Lunch attendees are asked chamber's annual luncheon, vote on proposed by-law to RSVP no later than noon held on Thursday, Jan. 3, revisions at the meeting, the Wednesday before. 9top by for all your farm auto cold weather needs Wiper Blades - Diesel Additives / / / Morrow County Grain Growers